Fandom

RPG Wikia

Ars Bellorum

4,025pages on
this wiki
Add New Page
Comments0 Share

Ars BellorumEdit

Rules for martial arts and secret societies in Ars Magica.

All characters which are trained in a martial art, or who are affiliated to a secret society, start the game with 150 experience points with which they must distribute among their abilities, techniques and the society in itself. Secret societies have a specific cost in experience, depending on their availability and power.

Characters can belong to a more “expensive” society, which offers its members a greater potential and advantage, but would start the game with few abilities, or can belong to a cheaper, weaker society, and start the game with more abilities and advantages.

Building a Secret Society:Edit

Societies cost experience points. Each experience point spent on the creation of a society must be used to purchase techniques, abilities and attributes that the society teaches and possesses.

The creation of a secret society is divided in three parts: the purchase of its attributes, techniques and abilities.

AbilitiesEdit

These are new abilities taught by the society to members only. The experience cost to associate a given restricted ability with a secret society is 5 experience points.

Abilities with requisites can only be added to a society if it also teaches its requisites.

Abilities are divided, for didactic purposes, in categories, being:

  • Bare handed abilities.
  • Melee weapon abilities.
  • Athletic abilities.

Techniques:Edit

Are virtues that members of the society can learn, which grant them specific bonuses in certain situations, or alter some game rule, allowing the user to perform feats otherwise restricted. Techniques are divided in Major or Ninor techniques, like virtues.

The cost for a society to teach a specific technique is 15 experience points to Minor techniques, and 30 to major.

Techniques are also divided, for classification purposes, in the following categories:

  • Bare handed techniques.
  • Melee weapon techniques.
  • Missile weapon techniques.
  • Athletic techniques.

AttributesEdit

These are values, ranging from 0 to 5, which measures the strength of the society in general. Secret societies have the following attributes:

Influence: How influent the members of the society are in the mundane world.
Resources: The average wealth of the society’s members.
Renown: How known (and appreciated) it is.
Members: How many members it possess.
Dispersion: How spread are its members.

Each attribute level costs 5 experience points. The attributes of a secret society cannot be developed during game, except by the efforts of players or storyguide determinations.

Below are the descriptions of each attribute and its levels:

Influence:

This attribute measures how high are the societies contacts or how well placed are its members, relating to the mundane world at large. Societies with a high influence have a much greater impact on the world politics, if they so choose to use it.
This attribute is bought by type: Political influence, Military influence, Religious influence, etc.
For instance: buying military influence for a society on a great city would indicate that one of its members, for instance, is the guard commander or an army general residing there.
0. The society have no influence and its members do not occupy any upstanding position within the mundane society.
1. The society is composed of members placed on minimally strategic positions, but already able to supply some sort of help to other members in eventual need. Examples: guard chiefs, tax collectors, noble secretaries, lawyers, knights, etc.
2. The society has influent members who can make one’s life quite easier: Guild leaders, mayors, landed nobles, etc.
3. The society is composed of influent members who command great respect on the temporal world, but without being excessively powerful: Barons, Counts, Bishops, etc.
4. The society is composed of highly placed members, at the highest and most sensitive stations: Generals, Princes, High chancellors, etc.
5. The society is composed of the most powerful people of the temporal world: Kings, Queens, the Pope, etc.

Resources:

This attribute indicates how much material help a member of this society can expect, be it in coin, service or property.
Societies with “Resources” over 0 must determine how they manage to get their possessions. Some societies steal, others require a periodic contribution from its members, others have ongoing investments in certain areas, etc.
0. The society provides no sort of material help to its members.
1. Members of this society can receive any standard or cheap equipment they need.
2. Members of this society receive any expensive equipment they need plus a minimum wage which’s enough for them to get average food and stay on most taverns.
3. Members of the society receive a generous stipend which allows them to pass for successful citizens on most places.
4. Members of this society receive a wealthy salary which allows them to live in luxury, with a small retainer of servants and employees.
5. Members of this society receive a lavish stipend with which they can live as kings. Each member is allowed a small castle for himself.

Renown

This attribute represents how many people know if this society’s existence, which is not to say that they know what it’s about, only that it exists.
Societies with greater renown have less trouble finding new members, and when one of its activities is disclosed to the general public, their reaction is usually as intense as the society’s renown (for better or worse).
Characters who belong to a society start the game with a reputation score equaling their society’s renown.
Societies with little or no renown have a hard time surviving by themselves: there must be a legend which attracts people to that idea.
0. No one has ever heard about this society.
1. Some people, in specific social circles, have heard about it.
2. As before, but anyone who studies a theme related to this society will inevitably have seen its name pop up once or twice.
3. The society is amply known of a specific audience (among merchants, among sailors, among nobility, etc) or in a specific region of the world.
4. This society is known at a continental level, and some people have heard about it in all points of the known world.
5. Everybody have heard about this society once.

Members

This attribute indicates the approximate number of people who compose the society, which usually means that each member can count on a stronger force when help is needed.
0. 4 to 20 members (a small group of friends).
1. 21 to 200 members (a large family or large group of friends).
2. 201 to 1000 members (an unknown mystical sect).
3. 1001 to 5000 members (a known mystical sect).
4. 5001 to 20000 members (an army special operations group).
5. More than 20000 members (all of mafia).

Dispersion

This attribute indicates how spread the society is: if it’s local, or if it’s present in widespread points of the known world. It is independent of the “Members” attribute, because a secret society can be small, and yet very disperse. A disperse society grants their members a greater ease when looking for further instruction or initiation.
0. One castle, one mansion, one dojo.
1. A great city.
2. A district or province.
3. A kingdom, a country.
4. A continent, a great group of kingdoms / countries.
5. All of the known world.

<Society> LoreEdit

Every character which belongs to a secret society starts the game with a new ability at level 1: the lore of his society, representing the society’s teachings, doctrines, history, famous names, relevant places and inner rituals. It is increased and studied much like any other ability, and is a focal point for the society’s initiations, seen below.

What a character knowsEdit

The experience points spent on creating a secret society represent the sum of all possible teachings that society can offer to its members, it does not represent the actual knowledge of the character which belongs to that society.

For a character who belongs to a secret society, the techniques are new virtues he can choose at character creation, and the abilities are new abilities. To actually begin the game with one of these virtues or abilities, the player must actually spend virtue points in the society’s virtues or experience points in the society’s abilities.

Usually, a player character begins the game with 150 extra experience points with which to purchase his secret society. This extra experience, however, can be used to purchase normal abilities (just as if he has spent more time than actually lived), although time restrictions do apply in an ability’s limits.

To actually use one of the society’s abilities, he must spend the 5 experience points for his society to teach it, and his own experience to have learned it.

Learning Techniques during the gameEdit

Abilities are learned during game in the normal fashion (they can only be taught or practiced: there are no books on martial arts abilities). The techniques, however, can only be passed on by a process of Initiation, much alike the one shown in “The Mysteries revised edition” and “Houses of Hermes: Mystery cults”, though with some changes.

Abilities are not taught, they are initiated from a character known as “Mystagogue” to a character known as “Initiate”. The Mystagogue have an “Initiation Total”, which is calculated as follows:

Initiation Total: Presence + <Society> Lore + Script bonus

Initiation Ease Factor: 15 for a minor technique, 21 for a major.

The “<Society> Lore” ability is the basis for an initiation, and a Mystagogue must have it in level 5 to initiate a character in a minor technique, or 7 to initiate a character in a major technique.

Furthermore, a character must have that ability in level 1 to be initiated in a minor technique, and 3 to be initiated in a major technique.

No Initiation roll is possible: if the Mystagogue´s Initiation Total exceeds the ease factor, the initiation takes place, and if not, it is not possible (and the Mystagogue knows this).

The Script Bonus refers to a bonus relating to actions which must be performed by the Initiate in order to achieve initiation. This Script is not very malleable, and is bound by the following rules:

Initiation Script:Edit

The Initiate must always spend an entire season serving the Mystagogue in any way he sees fit. At that season’s end, the Mystagogue sends the Initiate on a quest of his choosing (the details of each specific quest varies from society to society, and from technique to technique), at the end of which he must return and sacrifice something of great personal value (examples include all of his money, a very important item, all of his family bindings, etc). This sacrifice is made in the name of the society, and the Mystagogue himself cannot benefit from it directly. If these conditions are met, the Initiate can then spend story experience points (to a minimum of 18) to achieve Initiation, increasing the Mystagogue’s Initiation total. The basic script bonus is 10, plus the bonus granted from the story experience points spent, according to the following table:

 Experience:   Bonus:      Experience:   Bonus: 
 18   0      84   4 
 30   1      108   5 
 45   2      135   6 
 63   3      165   7 

Initiation Script Bonus: 10 + story experience bonus.

Considering that all Mystagogues must have the <Society> Lore ability at level 5, 18 points of story experience (mandatory) are usually enough to guarantee initiation into a minor Technique.

For the initiation into a major Technique, usually a greater expenditure of story experience is required, depending on the Mystagogue’s Initiation total.

Note that a Mystagogue can always tell if an Initiation will succeed or not, so a character always expend his experience knowingly, and has no danger of wasting it.

Once a character enters initiation, he MUST spend the minimum experience points needed to achieve initiation. No variation on this value is allowed (or needed).

No experience can grant a bonus over 7.

New AbilitiesEdit

These abilities can be used at any time during combat. However, only one of those can be used at once. If the character needs to use more than one of these abilities at he same turn, each further ability is subjected to a penalty of –3, cumulative to the number of abilities already used, and will inevitable incur in the expenditure of a fatigue point.

Bare handed abilities.Edit

Shatterer blow Pre-requisite: Focused attack 3+

This is the ability to attack an object in its weakest spot, and project in it a shockwave much more effective than a normal blow would. The character needs 10 – (Perception + Shatterer Blow) turns (minimum of 1) to find the right sport to hit. On a successful Dexterity + Shatterer blow roll, he breaks the object if causing 10% of the damage it would normally require.

The ease factor is 5 is the object is made of wood or something similar. 7 ir made of bricks or concrete. 9 if made of stone. 12 if made of metal.

During combat, this ability can be used to find the weak spot on an enemies armor. On a successful roll, only 1/5 of the enemy’s soak is applied to the next damage rolled.

Hand-blade parry

This ability allows a fighter to parry with this open hands a blow coming from a melee weapon (sword, lance, knife). It is used as a normal parry, instead of the character’s ability level in brawling.

The character parries the attack by “holding” the blade firmly in his palms.

Focused attack

This character can punch and kick with more potency than usual, adding to his brawling damage his level with this ability;

Disarming

This ability allows a character to attempt to disarm others with greater ease. It adds to a character’s attack rolls when trying to perform the “Disarm”, “Grab worn item” and “Take opponent’s weapon” maneuvers. It can also be performed with a weapon, but the character is at –3.

Melee weapon abilities.Edit

Quick weapon

This ability allows the character to add its level to the quickness modifier of his weapon, when determining his initiative total. This may even increase the quickness of bows or crossbows, which require reload.

Penetrating Attack

This is the ability to hit specific points of an armor (or hide, or skin, or scales, etc) where its protection is lower. It allows an attacker to ignore the target’s soak points in as much points as he have ranks on this ability.

This ability does not work on soak bonuses granted by purely magical protections (which, therefore, have no weak spots).

Precise Attack

This ability allows the character to strike at specific points on the target’s body with greater ease. Each rank reduces the ease factor penalty for striking at specific points of a target’s body by one.

Athletic abilities.Edit

Breath control

This character can control his breath movements in a way as to optimize his own metabolic flow. With that, he tires less and can exert physical activities for a longer time.

This ability is added to the character’s rolls to avoid the gain of fatigue points. It does not prevent the user from gaining fatigue points from magic or supernatural sources: only physical activities (techniques can receive this bonus).

Running

This ability allows the character to add its rank to the number of paces he can move per turn, for any one of the three types of movement on foot.

Vertical stepping

This ability allows the user to run through vertical, or very steep surfaces, such as walls. Running through these surfaces, he can give a number of paces equaling his rank in this ability. At the end of such movement, he must be stepping on a normal surface or will fall down.

Increased initiative

Each rank of this ability adds to the character’s initiative rolls.

Tenuous move

The character can walk and move through humanly impossible surfaces. He rolls his Dexterity + Tenuous Move to attempt such moves against an ease factor depending on the surface’s frailty:

 Surface:   Ease Factor 
 Thin Ice   3 
 Loose Bricks   5 
 Marble balls (without moving them)   7 
 Eggs   9 
 Silk sheets   10 
 Thin bamboo trunks (such as in “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”)   12 
 Water   15 
 Great Sword Blades (without cutting his feet)   17 

Steel-skin

Through a brutal training, maintained in a quite painful way, the character managed to thicken his muscles and skin and, when paying attention, can perform defenses using his thickened body parts, effectively increasing his soak value.

This ability’s rank is added to any of the character’s soak totals.

Improbable posture

This character can position himself in a fight in places where all os his opponents which are using missile attacks have a greater trouble hitting him. He user knows the statistical distributions of missile shots and places himself where the lowest number of shots are likely to hit him, therefore increasing the difficulty of any shot attempted at him.

This ability is added to all of the character’s defenses against missile attacks (even thrown weapons like knives, slings, or various objects).

Silence

This character can move much more silently. This ability is added to the character’s stealth skill whenever he is avoiding making noises, or whenever noise would work to his detriment.

Armor use

This ability allows a character to use an armor’s support points and thickness constructively, thus removing its encumbrance penalty.

The character can reduce the encumbrance penalty of an armor (and only an armor) in as much load points as he has ranks in this ability.

Magi also receive the benefits of this ability when casting spells.

Martial Arts TechniquesEdit

Like abilities, Techniques can only be used once per turn. If a character needs to perform more than one technique in he same turn, each new technique used incurs a mandatory gain of 1 fatigue point.

Many techniques wear the user. These techniques list that a user must perform a fatigue check whenever using any of them. The die for these checks is always stress.

Bare Handed TechniquesEdit

Feint (minor)

This character can feint: pretend he is going to when actually he is coming from, fool the opponent with a false attack.

In feinting, the character rolls his normal attack in the round. The defender rolls his Perception + Weapon (or Brawl) + Defense Bonus. If the character wins, the margin of successes is used, in the next turn (or in his next attack, whichever comes first), as a penalty for the defender, for one attack only.

If the next action of a character following a feint is not another attack on the same target, the feint bonus is lost. If his next action is another feint, the previous one’s bonus is also lost.

There is also a “melee weapon” version of this technique.

Prescient Parry (major)

This is the technique of parrying attacks by pure extra-sensorial perception. When the character is targeted, and is not aware of it, or even if he is aware but could not normally parry the attack, with this technique, he still gets a normal defense roll. This allows him to never get caught by surprise.

This technique negates the “Mindless Attack” technique.

This parry is performed by interposing a weapon (or shield) or physical member (arm, leg) before the attack. If the attack is strong enough to break the weapon or damage the member, the damage is still dealt normally. Any damage which overcomes the weapon’s resistance will affect the defender.

There is also a “melee weapon” version of this technique.

Projectile Parry (minor)

This technique allows a character to parry attacks coming from missile weapons. Usually, a fighter rolls such a defense with no defense bonus from weapons (or hands). With this technique, however, the target can perform a normal defense against all types of missile attacks (even bullets).

Double Attack (minor)

This is the ability to perform two attacks in the same round. The character perform one attack in his normal initiative round, and the second one at the end of the turn. If he uses this technique for two rounds in a row, he must check for fatigue gain every turn thereafter.

There is also a “melee weapon” version of this technique.

Projectile Counter-Attack (minor) requires “projectile parry”

This ability allows a character to not only parry a missile projectile, but also pick it up and send it back in the same action. Bullets cannot be counter-attacked, but darts, arrows, bolts, shurikens, and so on, can.

The character can use this technique whenever he is attacked by a projectile weapon which he manages to defend against.

The projectile is sent back to the attacker but the damage strength equals the character’s strength. A roll of Dexterity + Throwing is required to hit the projectile.

Earth Rage (minor)

At the beginning of a turn, the character can choose to sacrifice his health (thus assuming one light would) to get a +5 bonus in all of his attack rolls for the next 4 turns.

Justice Rage (minor)

If this character knocks an enemy down with a strike (either putting him unconscious or incapacitated), he can automatically perform a new attack in the same action against another enemy within range.

There is also a “melee weapon” version of this technique.

Tiger Claw (minor)

Bare handed attacks (and kicks) usually only cause fatigue damage, reducing a character’s wound levels only after he is knocked out.

This technique consist on the training of punches and kicks given with the fingers on a twisted, frontal position (imitating claws), allowing a character to rip open the adversary’s skin with his blows, causing him damage in his health levels, as a normal melee weapon would.

Distant Blow (major)

With this technique, the character can strike at an opponent at a distance. He performs his attack roll normally. The target can defend normally as well, but only if he is aware of that attack. If not, the ease factor for this strike is the same as for a missile attack. The target feels the damage as if it were a punch.

This blow requires a physical medium for propagation: one cannot strike at another through a glass, for instance, without first breaking the glass.

The range for this attack is the character’s line of sight. The damage caused is that of a normal punch.

This technique always requires the user to check for fatigue gain.

Blind Fight (major)

This character can fight without needing to see his opponents, attacking and defending normally. This technique does not replaces sight: it only allows a character to sense attacks and attackers (within range) based on other perceptions.

There is also a “melee weapon” version of this technique.

Power Brawling (minor)

This character learned to depend more on the strength of his blows than actual finesse. It allows him to replace his dexterity attribute for his strength in determining the attack total of his brawling attacks.

Melee Weapon TechniquesEdit

Prescient Parry (major)

This is the technique of parrying attacks by pure extra-sensorial perception. When the character is targeted, and is not aware of it, or even if he is aware but could not normally parry the attack, with this technique, he still gets a normal defense roll. This allows him to never get caught by surprise.

This technique negates the “Mindless Attack” technique.

This parry is performed by interposing a weapon (or shield) or physical member (arm, leg) before the attack. If the attack is strong enough to break the weapon or damage the member, the damage is still dealt normally. Any damage which overcomes the weapon’s resistance will affect the defender.

There is also a “bare handed” version of this technique.

Double Attack (minor) This is the ability to perform two attacks in the same round. The character perform one attack in his normal initiative round, and the second one at the end of the turn. If he uses this technique for two rounds in a row, he must check for fatigue gain every turn thereafter.

There is also a “bare handed” version of this technique.

Feint (minor)

This character can feint: pretend he is going to when actually he is coming from, fool the opponent with a false attack.

In feinting, the character rolls his normal attack in the round. The defender rolls his Perception + Weapon (or Brawl) + Defense Bonus. If the character wins, the margin of successes is used, in the next turn (or in his next attack, whichever comes first), as a penalty for the defender, for one attack only.

If the next action of a character following a feint is not another attack on the same target, the feint bonus is lost. If his next action is another feint, the previous one’s bonus is also lost.

There is also a “bare handed” version of this technique.

Justice Rage (minor)

If this character knocks an enemy down with a strike (either putting him unconscious or incapacitated), he can automatically perform a new attack in the same action against another enemy within range.

There is also a “bare handed” version of this technique.

Power Strike (minor)

This character learned to depend more on the strength of his blows than actual finesse. It allows him to replace his dexterity attribute for his strength in determining the attack total of his melee attacks.

Blind Fight (major)

This character can fight without needing to see his opponents, attacking and defending normally. This technique does not replaces sight: it only allows a character to sense attacks and attackers (within range) based on other perceptions.

There is also a “bare handed” version of this technique.

Missile Weapon TechniquesEdit

Muscular Memory (minor)

This character memorized the position and tension of his muscles when he performs a missile attack, and can repeat them precisely. With that, he can perform long ranged attacks without spending a turn aiming, and still receiving the full bonus for an aimed shot (+3). If he spends time aiming, he gets no bonus.

Intuitive Shot (minor)

This is the technique if shooting without thinking: guiding oneself purely by feeling. An intuitive shot occurs like any other shot, but uses Quickness instead of Dexterity for determining the character’s attack total.

Blind Shooting (major)

This technique’s user can perform missile attacks in inhumane fashion: he can shoot backwards, aiming through mirrors, through his legs, all without negative modifiers.

This technique removes all penalties the character may experience for shooting in awkward or deleterious positions, as long as the shot is physically possible, and the character have a good mental picture of the target’s position. For instance, if the character is in total darkness, he would need “Blind Fight” to picture the enemy’s positions. He could, however, shoot at anyone in a room, even behind himself, is he saw those persons at least once (even if the target moved from its previous location).

This technique does not negates distance, speed and size modifiers related to missile attacks.

Multiple Shot (major)

This technique allows a character equipped with a long range weapon to fire it in both his normal initiative round, and at the end of the turn, before the next one begins. Each use of this technique requires the character to check for fatigue gain.


Athletic TechniquesEdit

Perfect Stealth (major)

With this technique, the character can disappear in plain sight of all. He must spend a turn concentrating, and, as long as he remains motionless, he gets a +5 bonus to his roll. He must roll his Dexterity + Stealth against the Perception + Awareness of anyone seeing him who he wants to elude. He cannot elude viewers of which he is not aware of. In a success, all of the affected targets will cease to notice him for a number of turns equaling his margin of successes.

If the character attacks one of the targets, the effect is broken for that person (and he gets a full defense roll against the attack).

If the target is distracted, his roll is at –3. If someone is deliberately looking for the target, he gets a +3. If someone points at the character and alerts the others, they also get a +3 in their perception rolls.

Is the character uses a nageteepo (smoke bomb), or use some sort of distracting trick (moves behind a door, or curtain, for instance), he gets a further +3 in his Stealth roll.

Mindless Strike (minor)

Before a combat, this character can, checking for fatigue gain, perform an automatic, intuitive attack against a specific opponent, even before initiative is rolled. The target rolls his defense normally.

Enhanced Running (minor)

With this technique, the character can check for fatigue gain and increase his sunning speed, moving as if his “Athletics” ability were three times greater.

This effect lasts for an entire scene, or two hours (whichever ends first).

Evasion (major)

The character can check for fatigue gain and automatically dodge one long-ranged attack aimed at him. He can only use this technique once per round, ever.

Mountain Strength (major)

With this technique, the character can check for fatigue gain and ignore all damage coming from one single physical attack (fire is physical. Electricity and ice are too. Light is not).

Inexorability (minor)

The character can check for fatigue gain and completely ignore any negative modifier regarding wound levels for the turn, even being able to move and attack normally if he is incapacitated, falling unconscious or near death.

Enhanced Jumping (minor)

With this technique, the character can check for fatigue gain and increase his jumping distance, treating it as if his Athletics ability were three times greater.

This effect lasts for one jump, only.

Riding TechniquesEdit

These techniques work for any kind of mount, even aerial or aquatic ones: camels, horses, llamas, griffins, dragons, dolphins, sea horses, etc.

Born Rider (minor)

This technique allows a character to replace his riding skill for one of his attack abilities when fighting over a mount.

Cavalry Charge (minor)

Usually, a mounted character adds his level in Riding to his rolls up to a +3 bonus. However, with this technique, he can add his riding ranks to his attack rolls without limit, thus receiving its full bonus in his attacks and defenses.


Rules for the calculation of values when using two weapons at once:Edit

Initiative: Equals the greatest value of both initiatives. If the lowest initiative weapon is +1 or greater, add 1 to the main weapon’s initiative.
Attack Bonus: Equals the sum ob both weapon’s bonuses, plus 1.
Defense Bonus: Equals the sum of both weapon’s bonuses, less 1.
Damage: Equals the greatest bonus plus half the lowest one, round down, if the weapons are both the same type (great or single). If they have different types, use the greatest bonus only.
Minimum Str: Equals the sum of both minimum Strengths if both are positive. Equals the greatest minimum Strength plus half the other’s module if they are both negatives (without ever going over 0). Equals the greatest minimum Strength if one is positive and the other is negative.
Load: Equals the sum of both loads.

Move speed ande Jump distance:Edit

Move: for simplicity, assume one pace equals 1 meter or 1 yard.

Cautious approach: “9 + Quickness – Encubrance” paces per turn.
Normal move: “15 + Quickness” paces per turn.
Running: “30 + Quickness + Athletics” paces per turn.
Riding: “50 + Ride” paces per turn.

Jumping:

High Jump: ((4 + Strength or Dexterity + Athletics) / 5) – 0,2 in meters (or yards).
Running High Jump: Add the number of paces given to Strength, up to twice the normal High Jump value. This requires a check for Fatigue.
Broad Jump: ((4 + Strength or Dexterity + Athletics) x 0,6) – 1 in meters (or yards).
Running Broad Jump: Add the number of paces given to Strength, up to twice the normal Broad Jump value. This requires a check for Fatigue.

Sample Society: The Knights TemplarEdit

Created after the first crusade, in 1096, endorsed by the church in 1129, with the initial goal of protecting the pilgrims traveling into the holy land, by 1220 the Knights Templar are one of the most famous and powerful warrior societies at large.

They are composed of the finest warriors, all very well equipped and trained. Non warrior members usually manage a very large network of assets and lands throughout Europe.

Influence: 3 (15) Most members of the order are nobles or noble-born. Many received titles to lands reclaimed from the Muslims.

Resources: 4 (20) The order owns large amounts of land and grant its members access to enormous resources.

Renown: 5 (25) Everyone in Mythic Europe have heard about the legendary Knights Templar.

Members: 3 (15) By 1220, the Knights can count their numbers to thousands.

Dispersion: 4 (20) The Knights have a strong presence in France, England, Aragon, Portugal, Poitou, Apulia, Jerusalem, Tripoli, Antioch, Anjou, and Hungary.

Abilities:

  • Armor Use (5)

Techniques:

  • Double Attack (minor – 15)
  • Cavalry Charge (minor – 15)
  • Justice Rage (minor – 15)
  • Feint (minor – 15)

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.